I’m Back on Upwork

The Upwork drama ended. At least for now. After exchanging the same messages for about 3 days, their support sent me an email they have reactivated my account and I can use it as before.

This, however, doesn’t mean that after some time of inactivity (again, a freelancer is a human being and might need to take a few days off. Again, the concept of being a freelancer is being interpreted.
I am wondering, now that my profile is active again, how long it will take for the Upwork support to flag me again.
I think what freelancer platforms should do, is to define a set of specific rules and requirements that each freelancer should meet.

Provide Freelancers with Enough Opportunities 

There are not enough projects on Upwork to cover all freelancers’ capacity. And, as I explained in my previous post, based on my experience and monitoring of the active ads, some of them are being advertised without being truthful to the real terms of the offer. This reduces the amount of projects, making it even harder for the average freelancer to land a project. Again, if you are an extraordinary specialist and individual, you are likely to have clients outside Upwork and save the 20% extra fee for yourself, whilst you still have to pay government taxes.

Listen to Your Freelancer Community

Provide freelancers with the opportunity to give their real feedback about the platform. Seek their opinion on topics such as payment methods, payment rates, communication and collaboration methods. There might be several fields of service you cover, but all of them are being requested and provided by people. It’s the people that make the community, not the cash you take from them, or the automated messages you send to their mailboxes. If you cut your freelancers’ freedom of earning from the site as a primary or side hustle, you cut a piece of the community itself. It’s not worth it.

Provide Better Regulation Services

If you want to control your flow of fees, control who posts on the site and who accepts the offer. If a freelancer doesn’t get paid, you are likely to not get your cash too. If a freelancer accepts an offer and work outside Upwork regardless your advice to not do so and the risks that come with it, you are still not going to get that cash. I’ve reported multiple cases of advertised ads that are not being truthful, and inappropriate behaviour and I still got flagged.
To wrap this up, I am thankful that I got a positive response. I haven’t lost my faith, and I will keep taking the Upwork tests to check my level of expertise, improve my skills and continue learning new ones to provide my clients with better service, better expertise and guarantee them the positive outcome they hire me for.
I’d advise you to do the same.
2 Responses
  1. CarylHawtin

    Ultimately, it’s your responsibility to screen prospective freelancers to make sure their skills and experience meet the needs of your project. Custom screening questions can be included in your job post, and Upwork Messages provides chat and video conference tools for interviewing finalists.

    1. admin

      Yes, just as it is your responsibility to listen to the freelancers with proven track record and not ban them for not working (for themselves!) up to your expectations.

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